What’s This Mormon Thing?

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Archive for the ‘Chritian Service’ Category

Mormon view of Others Who Think Differently

Posted by JLFuller on December 24, 2008

While in Liberty jail in December 1838 to April 1839 unjustly, Joseph Smith and some fellow leaders of the Church agonized over the fate of their families and the members of the Church. This was a time when the Missouri extermination order was being carried out and thousands of Mormons were being driven from their homes by the Missouri militia and others. Joseph had pled for relief from the courts and government officials but none came. It was in the depths of his despair that Joseph begged the Lord for help for the Saints. This section was received at that time. It delineates the anti-Mormons from those who just disagree on theological grounds. It goes a long way in describing how many Mormons feel about those who promote hate and intolerance towards us.

 

Doctrine and Covenants 121 says, starting in verse 16:

  16 Cursed are all those that shall lift up the heel against mine anointed, saith the Lord, and cry they have sinned when they have not sinned before me, saith the Lord, but have done that which was meet in mine eyes, and which I commanded them.

  17 But those who cry transgression do it because they are the servants of sin, and are the children of disobedience themselves.

  18 And those who swear falsely against my servants, that they might bring them into bondage and death—

  19 WO unto them; because they have offended my little ones they shall be severed from the ordinances of mine house.

  20 Their basket shall not be full, their houses and their barns shall perish, and they themselves shall be despised by those that flattered them.

  21 They shall not have (the) right to the priesthood nor their posterity after them from generation to generation.

  22 It had been better for them that a millstone had been hanged about their necks, and they drowned in the depth of the sea.

 

Now some will maintain the LDS Scriptures are a concoction of Joseph Smith and are intended to deceive others. But there are just as many non-Mormons who have read them who are not sure what they read but they doubt the anti-Mormons. Whether these latter day scriptures originated from God as Joseph and the witnesses say, is irrelevant in thisa discussion. Mormons accept them as sacred and we think those that persecute us will be dealt with as you read above. To us it is doctrinal. It is scriptural and comes from God just as assuredly as if one read it in the Bible. It is as much a message from God as if Christ appeared to us in person as spoke it Himself. In fact, we believe He did speak what you read above. These are the words of Jesus Christ. It is our testimony. Differ from us if you will. We expect it. We truly seek to discuss these things with others. We do not believe that having a different opinion is sacrilegious or evil or in any way denigrates our beliefs. Nor does such a different belief automatically and permanatly condemn one to eternal separation from God. What we condemn are the behaviors we see today that continue the hatred, lies, distortions and ill treatment perpetrated against us. It is about behavior not belief.  

 

So what can anti-Mormons and others who think differently take from what I write? Do I think they have to change their thinking about the Church, its founder or our current leadership to please Mormons or God? No. I would like my words to have an impact on bad behavior but I recognize my opinion has little weight in those matters. Every person has to decide for themselves how to treat people they disagree with. It is an individual choice. We should be able to expect civil treatment and courteous behavior. All too often that does not happen. But it is what our Savior expects from all of us.

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Can Man Become a God?

Posted by JLFuller on July 20, 2008

If you believe what the bible says, yes.   Psalms 82:1,6-71 John 3:1-3, 2 Peter 1:2-4, Phillipians 2:5-6,  Romans 8:15-17, and Revelation 21:7 all talk about it. Genesis 3:22 indicates the belief has been around since before the earth was first populated. Many historical texts talk about it too.  Athanasius of Alexandria  wrote “God became human so humans would become gods” (On the Incarnation 54:3, PG 25:192B).  Maximus the Confessor said “A sure warrant for looking forward with hope to deification of human nature is provided by the incarnation of God, which makes man god to the same degree as God Himself became man.” and “let us become the image of the one whole God, bearing nothing earthly in ourselves, so that we may consort with God and become gods, receiving from God our existence as gods.” 
Many non-Mormon commentators have suggested Mormons believe we become equal to God the Father but that just isn’t quite correct. Mormon theology is a bit circumspect about it. The Maxwell Institute says “The state of man is also explained in Psalms 8:4-5, which asks, “What is man, that thou art mindful of him? and the son of man, that thou visitest him? For thou hast made him a little lower than the angels, and hast crowned him with glory and honour.” The word rendered “angels” in the King James and some other translations is Hebrew Elohim, which actually means “gods. See also Paul’s reasoning in Acts 17:22-29, where he says that humans are of the same species (Greek genos) as God and shouldn’t think of him as being otherwise.”  http://farms.byu.edu/faq.php?id=20&table=questions.
Some may argue that Eloheim actually means ruler or judge but Strong’s #430 says gods in the ordinary sense; but specifically used (in the plural thus, especially with the article) of the supreme God; occasionally applied by way of deference to magistrates; and sometimes as a superlative — angels, X exceeding, God (gods)(-dess, -ly), X (very) great, judges, X mighty.” It is translated as angels too but not as the first rank order definition so one must look elsewhere for further clarification and usage. The Biblical Heritage Center says the first rank of definitions is god or gods with angels, rulers and judges being second rank meanings. So is this Mormon concoction? Not according to scripture.

 
 
 
 
 
 

 

Posted in Biblical searching, Christian bible, Christian Service, Chritian Service, Church Attendance, Mormon polytheism | Tagged: , , , | 3 Comments »